CD Reviews 

Sweet-voiced trio will leave you howling for more 

The history of female vocal trios stretches back at least to the early 1930s, when the Boswell Sisters were jazzing up pop music. And from the Andrews Sisters to The Supremes to The Roches to the Dixie Chicks, every generation seems to have a trio of sweet-voiced women to stir things up "40 Days," Wailin’ Jennys (Red House)

The history of female vocal trios stretches back at least to the early 1930s, when the Boswell Sisters were jazzing up pop music. And from the Andrews Sisters to The Supremes to The Roches to the Dixie Chicks, every generation seems to have a trio of sweet-voiced women to stir things up. Count the Wailin’ Jennys as the most melodious trio in Americana music.

Although Canadian-based singer-songwriters Ruth Moody, Cara Luft and Nicky Mehta each have solo careers, they create truly gorgeous music when they band together.

The trio’s first full-length album is filled with sweet harmonies, smart songs and great vibes. The Jennys blend so well both with their vocals and their original songs that it’s hard to distinguish one’s style from that of another. They sound like a sister act without being one.

More upbeat than fellow Canadian female trio the Be Good Tanyas, the Wailin’ Jennys are never dour when they go deep. Mehta’s "Ten Mile Stilts" and, even more impressively, Moody’s "Heaven When We’re Home" may address desires unfulfilled, but retain hopefulness. Likewise, energetic harmonies twist Luft’s downbeat "Untitled" into something inspiring.

A revival of the traditional "Saucy Sailor" gives the group a folk footing, and excellent covers of Neil Young’s "Old Man" and John Hiatt’s "Take It Down" fill out an already impressive set.

When these Jennys wail, it’s well worth your time to listen.